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Jon Trickett MP, Labour’s Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office, has today written a reply to Sir Jeremy Heywood’s letter to him and Ed Miliband yesterday setting out questions that still need to be answered on Lynton Crosby’s role.

Full text of the letter below:

Dear Sir Jeremy,

Thank you for your letter of 23 July in response to letters from me and from Ed Miliband, which I think you will acknowledge leaves a number of questions unanswered. It is notable that you have chosen not to give your own judgement on any of the substantive issues raised with you.

Significantly, you do not say – just as the Prime Minister has not said – that the tobacco lobbyist Lynton Crosby has had no discussions with the Prime Minister about tobacco policy. Nor do you say that there is no conflict of interests between Mr Crosby's role advising the Conservative Party and his role advising a number of commercial organisations who have an interest in Government policy.

Thank you also for passing on “the principles of engagement between Lynton Crosby and the Conservative Party” – which are undated. The journalist Michael Crick has quoted a Conservative Party source as saying “The principles of engagement capture what was agreed at the time Lynton was hired... verbal agreement on the principles of engagement was made at the time Lynton was hired. This was written down in the last couple of days and published today.” It therefore appears that this was not properly drawn up by civil servants in order to avoid conflicts of interest in Government, but hastily cobbled together after Mr Crosby had become a political embarrassment to the Conservative Party.

In addition, there remains a significant lack of clarity over who Lynton Crosby's clients are, and whether either the Government or the Conservative Party have any idea who they are.

The Prime Minister's spokesman reportedly “said that he had been unaware that Mr Crosby’s British company had Philip Morris Ltd, whose brands include Marlboro, as a client” (The Times, 13 July 2013). And on BBC Radio 4's World At One programme last Wednesday, the Conservative Party Chairman Grant Shapps said that “It is a matter for Lynton Crosby who his clients within the company are”. Yet on BBC 2’s Newsnight last Tuesday, the Health Secretary suggested that he was privy to details of Mr Crosby’s clients when he said that public health was an area Lynton Crosby never advised the Prime Minister on “because his company has clients in that area”.

Clearly, if the Prime Minister and the Conservative Party are unaware of who Mr Crosby's clients are – which is what the Chairman of the Conservative Party says is the case – then you will agree that the principles of engagement are unenforceable and worthless. In the interests of transparency Mr Crosby’s company’s full client list should be published immediately.

I would be grateful if you would answer the questions below.

Were you or any civil servants involved in any way in the drawing up of the terms of engagement published yesterday? 

Did you know that the principles of engagement which you sent me had only been “written down in the last couple of days”? 

Did you know about them before this week, and when did you first see them? 

Do you have any evidence at all that these principles have been followed?

Are you personally satisfied that Lynton Crosby has had no discussions with the Prime Minister or other Ministers about tobacco policy, alcohol policy, NHS policy or fracking policy?

Are you personally satisfied that there is no possibility of a conflict of interests between Mr Crosby’s roles as an adviser to the Conservative Party and an adviser to commercial organisations?

Do you know who Mr Crosby’s commercial clients are, and in the interests of transparency will you ensure that a full list is published immediately?

Given the continued public interest in these matters I am releasing this letter to the press.

Yours sincerely,

Jon Trickett MP

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